Treat “the” as part of a publication’s title (capitalizing, italicizing, including in quotes, as appropriate) only when so treated by the publication in question; check the masthead to be sure.

Grammar

Synonym that can be used interchangeably for junior. Hyphenate the adjective: He is in his third year; he is a third-year student.

GrammarTitles and Names

Constructions indicating a range (of time, for example, or other inclusive numbers) use an en dash, not a hyphen: 7–10 p.m.; 1995–1997; A–F; pages 211–15. See also from.

Grammar

Users of English disagree on how to form the possessive of singular nouns ending in “s.” AP adds only an apostrophe to singular proper nouns ending in “s” (Charles’ book); other style guides take other approaches. Be consistent within the publication.

Grammar

No hyphen; adjective only. Avoid in print the noun “­postdoc,” informal academic jargon for a postdoctoral position or research or funding, or for someone engaged in postdoctoral work.

GrammarPreferred Spelling

No hyphen; adjective only. Avoid “postgrad.”

GrammarPreferred Spelling

Follow AP style: The rules of prefixes apply, but in general do not use a hyphen when forming a compound that does not have special meaning and can be understood if not is used before the base word. Use a hyphen, however, before proper nouns or in awkward combinations, such as non-nuclear.

Grammar

Acceptable as a synonym (adjective or noun) for the University of Georgia only in sports stories and, occasionally, in alumni periodicals and marketing materials: She played for Georgia in 1991. He is a Georgia graduate. We’re Georgia.

UGA is the preferred abbreviation.

Grammar